Sunday, August 05, 2007

darn, I cant remember which side of the issue I'm supposed to take!

I don't see anything intrinsically wrong with laying flowers before Mary after Communion at a wedding, but I have some vague recollection of recently reading somewhere why we're not supposed to. Any ideas? The only one I can think of is the whole "we don't add things that aren't in the rubrics" reason.
(which, as weddings tend to go, would be the LEAST of liturgical abuses...)

and speaking of which, if I ever get married, I will have an interesting wedding. The priest will definitely walk down the aisle. Myself and my bridesmaids (if I decide to have them-after being in several weddings, they seem so...superfluous!) will walk down to the Gregorian chant proper antiphon introit thingy, sung by a schola of men. The same for Offertory and Communion. ha. and that's just for starters...

(someone asked, "Mara, don't you realize that there will be someone else involved in the planning of this wedding?" my reply? "um, well, if he's marrying me, he's going to know my opinion stands in all things musical, unless he has similar [or better] tastes in music and beliefs about liturgy. [that'd be nice, but unlikely...] I mean, gosh, he can pick the dresses, the flowers, whatever, I don't care!")

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

I have the same attitude towards my (potential) wedding. I know what music I'll want, the Mrs. can do all the reception planning she likes so long as she stays away from the music!

-Gavin

BONIFACE said...

Mara, the real person you have to watch out for when planning a wedding is not your groom...it is your mother and his mother. They will hijack the whole thing if you let them...keep them as far away as possible from stuff regarding the ceremony. Just let them be content with setting up the catering and paying for everything.

Mara Joy said...

haha...ouch. sounds like you have some experience with that one...

Domini Sumus said...

Mara, you would love my wedding. I will have to write about it when I get the chance. It was anything but the norm and Boniface is right. I got the most trouble from my parents and his parents. With everything we did that was "untraditional" my mother in law thought the most scandalous part of the Mass was the fact that we didn't have an aisle runner. lol!

Cantor said...

Wedding introit: the question is, to use one of the ones in the 1974 Graduale or the neo-Gregorian one in the pre-V2 rite?

I find the wedding chant propers interesting - “Fear the Lord, all you his holy ones”, etc. I’d be interested sometime in seeing how whoever decided on the post-V2 propers (which by and large do not match the pre-V2 ones) was/were thinking.

Luckily, the “Ecce sic benedicetur” communion, another neo-Gregorian one left out of the 1974 Graduale, can be just given verses from the rest of the psalm.

Mara Joy said...

meh! but no one has answered my Mary-song question!

Cantor said...

ISTM that a reading of the intro and rubrics of the Rite of Marriage give the impression that, of the various rites, the Church “assumes the least ownership” over this rite, even going so far as to allow episcopal conferences to draft their own revised rites. This makes sense given, IIRC, that marriage came into Roman liturgy (Roman, at least) fairly late in the game.

Personally, I don’t have a problem with flowers to Mary after communion at a wedding. That said, the practice strikes me as somehow reminiscent of schlocky 50s Marian hymns. I’d hope a woman I would marry would not want to do it. But, that’s a subjective appraisal, and given that the wedding rubrics seem almost to “apologize for their own existence”, I can’t come up with a good objective reason to disallow the practice.

Incidentally, Mara, you might also consider what your parents would want at your wedding. Two friends of mine got married and had a ceremony remarkably similar to the one you describe, except the mother of the bride was ready to disown the two of them if they didn’t do the flowers. :)

Cantor said...

FYI, the current English translation of the wedding rite is older than the current Latin text. ICEL apparently has finished translating the new edition, but Rome wants the Missal to be published first. But, you didn’t hear that from me. ;-)